New records of the Paleotropical migrant Hemianax ephippiger in the Caribbean and a review of its status in the Neotropics

Tropical America is currently experiencing the establishment of a new apex insect predator, the Paleotropical dragonfly Hemianax ephippiger (Odonata: Aeshnidae). H. ephippiger is migratory and is suggested to have colonised the eastern Neotropics by chance Trans-Atlantic displacement. We report the discovery of H. ephippiger at three new locations in the Caribbean, the islands of Bonaire,…

Critical species of Odonata in the Neotropics

This report summarizes progress that has been made during the past five years toward the understanding of Neotropical Odonata. It also presents a list of critical species and sites, threats to Odonata conservation in the region, and priorities for further research. This region, the richest in the world for Odonata, must be a focus of…

Redescription of Erythrodiplax pallida (Needham, 1904) (Odonata: Libellulidae)

A redescription of both sexes of Erythrodiplax pallida (Odonata: Libellulidae) is provided based on specimens collected in shallow wetlands associated with flood plains from small streams to large rivers in Corrientes and Buenos Aires provinces, Argentina. The vesica spermalis morphology resembles those of the basalis and nigricans groups due to the presence of median and…

Microneura is a junior synonym of Protoneura (Zygoptera, Coenagrionidae)

Microneura caligata (Hagen in Selys, 1886) is an endangered damselfly presently known from five localities in the central mountains of Cuba. The precise systematic position of this species within the former Neotropical Protoneuridae has been the subject of debate, with previous results from a phylogenetic analysis based on morphology suggesting that the genus Microneura should…

An update on the distribution of threatened odonate species from the Greater Antilles

The Antilles harbour several island endemic odonate species, including some palaeoendemics, within a relatively small and anthropized area. Such attributes give this archipelago a special significance for the conservation of Odonata in the Neotropics. However, despite the importance of these islands, inadequately surveyed regions persist, mainly in the Greater Antilles, and there is not enough…

Reproductive behavior of Acanthagrion truncatum Selys, 1876 (Odonata: Coenagrionidae)

Behavioral data on Neotropical coenagrionids is still scanty, with very few studies on their reproductive behavior. Here we present the first description of the reproductive behavior of A. truncatum in a high density population in the Brazilian Neotropical savanna. The observations were made at a pond in an ecological reserve. Males remain at the water…

Checklist and updated distribution of Protoneuridae from Brazil

Protoneuridae are represented in the neotropics by 16 genera and 117 species, of which 64 species in 12 genera are known to occur in Brazil. Most of them are known only from the original descriptions or isolated records. During 2009 the Protoneuridae collection of MNRJ was revised; 2800 specimens were studied, belonging to 40 species…

The life history of a temperate zone dragonfly living at the edge of its range with comments on the colonization of high latitudes by Neotropical genera of Zygoptera (Odonata)

Of the many Zygopteran genera that occur in the Neotropics, only five (Hetaerina, Archilestes, Lestes, Argia, and Ischnura) are represented north of 40°N in North America, and only three of these (Hetaerina, Archilestes, and Argia) probably had a tropical origin. In the two genera of Lestidae (Archilestes and Lestes) the life history of temperate-zone populations…

Revision of the subgenus Marmaraeschna (Odonata: Aeshnidae)

This revision of the subgenus Marmaraeschna includes the description of three new species: Aeshna (M.) fissifrons, A. (M.) obscura and A. (M.) brevicercia, as well as redescriptions of the previously known species, including the first description of the male of A. (M.) pallipes, a key for males and females and an updated distribution for each…