Sexual size dimorphism, mating system and seasonality of a Neotropical damselfly, Telebasis carmesina (Coenagrionidae)

Our understanding of mating systems is highly skewed toward temperate examples. This study investigated the mating system, sexual size dimorphism and seasonal variation in local distribution and abundance of male and female Telebasis carmesina, a common damselfly in Brazilian tropical savanna. In a natural reserve, daily census and behavioral observations were made throughout 1 year…

Season and temperature dependent location of mating territories in Somatochlora flavomaculata in a heterogeneous environment (Odonata: Corduliidae)

In a heterogeneous environment, males of Somatochlora flavomaculata regularly occupy site-fixed locations away from water, adjacent to vertical landscape elements, and to a lesser extent, also at water, i.e. at oviposition sites. Territories both over land and over water are typically patrolled by continuous site-fixed flights. These places serve as rendezvous sites where copulation is…

Diel pattern of activity, mating, and flight behaviour in Onychogomphus uncatus (Odonata: Gomphidae)

The behaviour of Onychogomphus uncatus, including flight and mating activity, was studied at a fast-flowing irrigation canal. During the day, males perched in sections of the canal with a strong current and a turbulent water surface. During short flights, interactions with other con-specific and hetero-specific males occurred, particularly with Orthetrum coerulescens. Under conditions of high…

A scientometric analysis on pre- and post-copulatory traits in Odonata

In the last decades, studies on sexual selection in odonates have shown a relationship between mating success and costly sexual ornaments, mainly male characters. Here, we conducted a scientometric analysis to assess the state of art of studies on sexual selection in odonates, especially on the role of male ornamentation (pre-copulatory traits) and sperm competition (post-copulatory traits).

To harass or to respect: the economy of male persistence despite female refusal in a damselfly with scramble mate competition

In sexual conflict, males are often thought to gain fitness benefits from harassing females over mating. Yet when harassment itself incurs costs to males and if alternative, receptive females are available in a local population, theory predicts that when confronted with a female refusal, a male’s choice of persisting or retreating is determined in part by the likelihood of achieving a mating.

Role of visual and non-visual cues in damselfly mate recognition

In many species of damselflies, sexual conflict in the form of male harassment is thought to explain the widespread existence of female-limited color polymorphisms. With a few exceptions, the majority of investigations into these mating systems have assumed that male damselflies primarily use visual cues to detect and recognize their mates. Recently, laboratory studies have…

Survival is predicted by territorial status but not wing pigmentation in males of a polythorid damselfly, Euthore fasciata (Odonata: Zygoptera: Polythoridae)

Robust male condition must be favored and should be signaled to conspecifics via enhanced aggression and more highly expressed ornamental traits. One way that such robust condition, and thereby the expression of aggression and ornamental traits, can be assessed is via survival. In odonate adults, condition (in the form of lipid reserves, muscle mass and…

Detection probabilities and sampling rates for Anisoptera exuviae along river banks: influences of bank vegetation type, prior precipitation, and exuviae size

Exuviae collections have considerable value in population studies of Odonata, but methods for standardizing collections or estimating densities and detection probabilities have been little studied. I measured sampling rates for Anisoptera exuviae and used a maximum likelihood, four-pass, depletion population estimator to standardize collections and to estimate exuvial densities and detection probabilities along 10 riverbank…